Malta2 Something Totally Random
Education and culture Socrates European union

With the support of the Socrates Programme of the European Union

Parallel sessions

Friday

Session A

 Emotional Diathesis and Emotional Stress and Childhood Stuttering. D. Choi, E.G. Conture & T.A. Walden                                                                                                                                                                 Affiliation: Vanderbilt University
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess whether preschool-age children who stutter (CWS)'s emotional diathesis, emotional stress, and their interaction are associated with their stuttering frequency. Measurement of participants' emotional diatheses (e.g., emotional reactivity) was based on parents' report, with their stuttered disfluencies measured during a narrative after viewing each baseline, positive and negative video clip. Findings suggest that there was an
EU Symposium Fluency Disorders 2014 2 interaction effect on stuttered disfluencies between negative emotional diathesis and negative emotional stress.

"Lexipontix": Developing a Structured Stuttering Therapy Programme for School Age Children. G. Fourlas &  D. Marousos
Affiliation: Stuttering Research & Therapy Centre, Greece & Eu-legein
Abstract: "Lexipontix" is a structured stuttering therapy programme based on principles of CBT, PCI, SFBT, Fluency Shaping and Stuttering Modification approaches. It is administered in two phases and involves the whole family. Phase-A lasts for 12 weeks. The duration of phase-B depends on individual needs. "Lexipontix" is a mouse trying to invade and gain control over "the factory of mind" which produces thoughts, emotions, somatic reactions and behaviours. The child, as a member of the therapeutic alliance, is empowered to use CBT "tools" to identify the mouse invasions, to retain/regain control over communication and achieve communication restructuring. The programme structure and the development process followed are presented.

Session B 

Results of a universal screen for fluency for 4-5 year-olds. P. Howell, A. Mirawdeli & A. Campbell
Affiliation: University College London                                                                                                               Abstract:  Speech language therapy (SLT) services in the UK and over Europe are under pressure, partly because schools are not identifying cases where they suspect a child of having a speech communication need (SCN) including stuttering. A procedure is described which allows teachers to identify SCN and to make a provisional referral to SLT services who can then assess and treat the children in their normal way. The procedure bases the assessment on speech alone, leaving emotional issues etc. to be dealt with by SLTs who have the necessary professional training. The results with the procedure are discussed for children whose first language is English or another native language. Future steps for development of the screen, and provision of a training package for use in schools are discussed.

Profiling subjects that stutter: a comparison between adolescents and children. F. Del Gado, D. Tomaiuoli, M.G. Spinetti, E. Capparelli & P. Falcone                                                                                  Affiliation: C.R.C. Balbuzie
Abstract: Profiling stuttering subjects (among the programs utilized, the MIDA-SP may be viewed as such) is a useful tool for synthesizing the result of an assessment and in order to provide the subject with a direction in his therapeutic work. The results of a study conducted on a sample of 200 stuttering patients aged between 6 and 18.
Some parameters were analyzed, among which the frequency of single profiles per age group and gender type, observing a significant difference in the distribution of the profile frequency in the adolescent subgroups compared to the children's subgroup.

Session C

Using narrative practices to develop preferred stories about stuttering. M. O'Dwyer, F. Ryan & M. Leahy
Affiliation: HSE South & Trinity College Dublin                                                                                                   Abstract:  Narrative therapy (White & Epston, 1990) creates opportunities for the development of alternative stories to the problem based one presented by the client. Two particular ways of establishing alternative and preferred stories in stuttering therapy are described. These are taken from Narrative Therapy and involve:
1. Identifying the absent but implicit aspects of a problem story through double listening.
2. Responding as an "outsider witness", a practice taken from a structure within narrative therapy known as "Definitional Ceremonies."
Participants in this workshop are given opportunities to practice these ways of responding to stories told by people who stutter.

Session D

First aid guide for teachers in supporting CWS: a 3-steps seminar.  S. Adriaensens, V. Waelkens & P. Fieremans                                                                                                                                                            Affiliation: University of Antwerp, Artevelde University College, private practice 'De Trampoline'                 Abstract: Increasing knowledge of stuttering in teachers could ensure that interactions in classroom complement the therapeutic process. It is therefore worrying that teachers often express feelings of being unprepared to work with CWS. On request of the Belgian Stuttering Association, three brochures (kindergarten teachers, primary and secondary school teachers) for teachers were developed. In a 3-steps seminar the brochures will be introduced, pointing out important
considerations per educational level. Secondly results of a study evaluating the brochures will be presented. Finally a group discussion will include participants' experiences with undesirable attitudes in teachers and possible obstacles for teachers in searching information on stuttering.



Saturday

Session A

Treatment time with the Lidcombe Program: Benchmarks for bilingual children.  R.C. Shenker
Affiliation: Montreal Fluency Centre                                                                                                                  Abstract: Three previous studies have found that the median number of clinic
visits to Stage 2 of the Lidcombe Program for treatment of stuttering in young children, is 11 for English speaking children. The current study replicated previous findings with a file audit of 60 preschool age
children who spoke two or more languages. Results are comparable to the findings for monolingual children from the USA, Australia and UK. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.

Presentation of BSV (Belgian stuttering association) & animation film 'STUTTERING'. E. Lamens 
Affiliation: BSV Belgian Stuttering Association
Abstract: The aim of this workshop is to present BSV (the Belgian Stuttering Association). Target Public: everyone interested in the Belgian stuttering world:  who is it for?  who is on the board  the Scientific Board!  how we use the social media  our yearly ISAD  how we get media attention
Première ‘Stuttering':
 animation film 8' English version about stuttering Extra: 'Stuttering Music': This idea created nationwide media attention for our ISAD 2012. A great list of songs all about stuttering. EU

Session B

Timing and Tallying Dysfluencies using Praat software.  P. Corthals
Affiliation: U of Ghent                                                                                                                                           Abstract: This study examined the relationship between stuttering severity ratings and the number (tallied) as well as the duration (timed) of stuttering symptoms in 36 one-minute speech samples extracted from the University College London's Archive of Stuttered Speech. Each sample was rated for stuttering severity by 40 listeners (all native speakers of English). Using Praat software, recordings were annotated to delineate stuttering instances according to Packman and Onslow's taxonomy. A script was used to quantify tallied and timed parameters. Pearson correlations showed that the latter were better predictors of perceived severity.

The effect of different breathing patterns on stuttering therapy outcome. T.Nabieva
Affiliation: Brain Research dept. of Scientific Neurology Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences
Abstract: 35 stuttering children used different speech-related breathing patterns during stuttering therapy course. After four weeks all subjects demonstrated positive alterations. The best results were achieved in groups with intensive respiration. To discover bioelectrical correlates of different types of breathing we recorded EEG-activity in healthy adults during different breathing behavior, but didn't reveal any significant alterations. We suppose that effectiveness of treatment might possibly be determined by extensive muscle load during intensive respiration. Intensive breathing requires considerable muscular effort and persistently applied, appears to be strength training for speech-related muscles. It could possibly induce positive alterations in central and peripheral mechanisms of neuromuscular transmission, resulting in reducing of pathological involuntary activity.

Session C

Public Attitudes Towards Stuttering: Epidemiological Study Of An Irish Population. C. Daly & M. Leahy
Affiliation: Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Abstract: Negative attitudes towards stuttering have been found among young children and speech and language therapy students in Ireland. The consequence of negative attitudes is stigmatisation. This researchinvestigates the range of attitudes in a sample of the Irish population using POSHA-S and compares these with attitudes towards stuttering in other countries using POSHA. Results indicate that people in Ireland are aware of stuttering, however, knowledge about some specific aspects of the disorder is limited. This indicates the need to disseminate scientific information about stuttering in Ireland.  

Attitudes and knowledge of the Portuguese population about stuttering. A.R. Valente, L.M. Jesus, M. Leahy & K.O. St Louis                                                                                                                                                                                                 Affiliation: IEETA, University of Aveiro, Trinity College Dublin & West Virginia University                                                   Abstract: Published studies on attitudes about people who stutter (PWS) are nonexistent for the Portuguese population. The Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes - Stuttering (POSHA-S) was translated to European Portuguese and adapted for administration in Portugal. A majority of the sample reported contact with PWS, possibly explaining more accurate attitudes than the POSHA-S EU Symposium Fluency Disorders 2014 2 database median for some traits, potential of PWS, and social distance. Breadth of knowledge was lower than the median, possibly leading to some stereotypes for traits or inaccurate views of stuttering causes or views regarding stuttering help. Overall, the Portuguese population holds more positive-than-average attitudes toward PWS.

Session D

From genes to social context: Understanding and treating stuttering in a biopsychosocial framework. T. Weidig & G. Michaux
Affiliation: The Stuttering Brain blog, Centre of Health Zitha Hospital
Abstract: Genetic, neurobiological, behavioural, cognitive, and social factors contribute towards the dysfunction and handicap experienced by people who stutter, and are also key to an improvement of the condition. In an upcoming book, we propose an overarching framework to model all biopsychosocial drivers of human processes, and apply it here to stuttering. The neurobiological basis of stuttering is modelled as a neurological demand and capacity issue, whose impact propagates to all other areas of the human system. After presenting the model, we ask the audience to participate in the evaluation of a case study, including a discussing of treatment options.